When constructing a home, the first step is the same every time – build a strong foundation. When it comes to gardening, the same is true: the success of your plants relies on a strong foundation underground – your soil. In order to build a strong soil foundation, you must first understand the type of native soil that exists in your area. This will help determine the type of growing mix you should add to improve the structure of existing soil and create the perfect garden and growing environment for your plants.

Clay Soil

Clay soils are characterized by a dense, heavy texture and retain moisture for long periods of time. While not inherently bad, most garden plants prefer a lighter soil where water drains more freely. To improve clay base soils, add plenty of organic matter to loosen texture and improve drainage. PRO-MIX® Organic Vegetable and Herb Mix contains plenty of sphagnum peat moss, humus and compost making it the perfect mix to improve clay soils.

Sandy Soil

Sandy soils are soft and coarse in texture, freely draining with low moisture content and are often low in organic matter. Many plants such as cacti, succulents and citrus perform well in sandy soils, but to improve moisture retention and plant drought tolerance, generously amend with organic matter. PRO-MIX® All Purpose Mix, is ideal for enriching sandy soils, high in organic matter it will help your plants through summer drought periods.

Loamy Soil

Loamy soils are soft and loose in texture and often contain more organic matter than clay and sandy soil, making them a good foundation for most garden plants. To ensure continued plant performance in loamy soil, use a rich, balanced soil mix with plenty of nutrients to feed your plants. Organic rich PRO-MIX® Garden Mix is ideal as it contains a nine month slow release fertilizer for a long-lasting nutrient boost. Whether your garden is built on clay, sand or loam, PRO-MIX® has the perfect soil to help build a strong garden foundation for years of beauty and performance.  

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